G0oUBMJsWakD6U8F6zZjeg.jpg

Antiques Roadshow

Start watching
cYWAg84-show-poster2x3-LpD4fIm.jpg

Finding Your Roots

Start watching
hYD8A32-show-poster2x3-WZIiyi9.jpg

PBS NewsHour

Start watching
ED6PSZP-show-poster2x3-Ve6hmZh.jpg

NOVA

Start watching
6HWbNHN-show-poster2x3-c7tgE2Y.png

Artbound

Start watching
Membership Card
Support PBS SoCal by becoming a member today.
Other Ways to Give Card
Learn about the many ways to support PBS SoCal.
Connect with Our Team Card
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.
Celebrate Black History Month
This February, PBS SoCal and KCET invite you to explore and celebrate the central role Black Americans have played in shaping American history and their extraordinary contributions to culture and arts. Watch all month on broadcast, on the PBS SoCal and KCET websites, and streaming on the free PBS app. And find companion articles that examine aspects of Black history in Southern California. Headlining the programming is the two-part series "The Black Church: This Is Our Story, This Is Our Song,” hosted by Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr, which traces the 400-year-old story of the Black church in America.

Related Content

Discover More
Members of the Pentecostal church praising the Lord.
Event
The Black Church

"The Black Church" Screening, The Church's History in Los Angeles

February 24: Join PBS SoCal for a special screening of "The Black Church: This is Our Story, This is Our Song"
Host, Henry Louis Gates Jr. standing in front of stained glass at Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago
Event
The Black Church

"The Black Church" Screening, Gospel Music in Los Angeles

February 18: Join PBS SoCal for a special screening of "The Black Church: This is Our Story, This is Our Song"
A small child holds their fist in the air and holds a sign that reads "I'm gonna change the world." | iStock
Article

Seven Ways to Honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Legacy with Children

As MLK Day approaches, we owe it to our children — and to ourselves — to talk about Dr. King's work, honor his legacy and consider what his work means today.
Paul R. Williams on the other side of the desk showing plans | J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles
Article
Hollywood’s Architect: The Paul R. Williams Story

Seven of Paul Revere Williams' Outstanding Architectural Feats (That Aren't Homes)

In an era where architects typically majored in one style, he excelled in every architectural style, making him one of the most renowned architects throughout the world despite the discriminatory racial practices of his time. 
hollywoods_architect
Article
Hollywood’s Architect: The Paul R. Williams Story

Visual Timeline: The Remarkable Life of Paul Revere Williams

In the course of his five-decade career, Paul Revere Williams, an African American architect born in Los Angeles on February 18, 1894, overcame prejudice and become one of the foremost architects in history. The path he has forged has served as an inspiration for young architects to this day. Learn more about the man and events that shaped his life in this timeline.
Elliott Pinkey's original artist proof of "Slaying of the Dragon," as presented to Charles Dickson. Acrylic on Masonite board | Jenise Miller.
Article
Artbound

Something from Nothing: When Compton's Communicative Arts Academy Made the City its Canvas and Muse

From 1969 to 1975, Compton's Communicative Arts Academy invigorated the city with art by establishing Compton as canvas and muse as well as by transforming buildings into venues and objects for art in the community.
Paul R. Williams on the other side of the desk showing plans | J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles
Article
Lost LA

Paul Williams: A Pioneering African American Architect

Paul Revere Williams is known as an architect to the stars, one of the first African Americans who achieved stature in a racially divided profession, but he also created civic works that spoke to the legacy he wanted to leave behind.
The Baby Nancy doll produced by Shindana Toys | Still from "Lost LA" Shindana Toys
Article
Lost LA

Shindana Toys: Dolls That Made a Difference

During the late 19th and early 20th century, many mass-produced black dolls were stereotypical, caricature-like and expressed racist undertones. Shindana Toys helped change the paradigm, irrevocably changing the toy industry today.
Church service. Image from “Artbound” How Sweet The Sound: Gospel In Los Angeles ABs10 Gospel
Article
Artbound

Los Angeles’s Role in the Rise and Mainstreaming of Gospel Music

Los Angeles has influenced gospel music for decades, but its contributions to gospel are frequently overlooked. Now, that appears to be changing.
Active loading indicator