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Learn to Count to Seven by Making a Duck Necklace

Make a duck mask necklace and quack along as we count and solve basic math equations.
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A number sentence is an expression that contains numbers and mathematical symbols. For example: 3 + 4 = 7. Number sentences are used to introduce young children to basic math concepts. This activity gives us a fun way to solve math sentences by counting (and quacking) the feathers on a duck mask that is used as a necklace.
Esta actividad también está disponible en español.

Make a Duck Mask Necklace and Learn to Count to Seven

This activity is included in backpacks PBS SoCal shares with parents of young children in our communities. The Frieda Berlinski Foundation is helping us offer these activities as digital tools for other parents who can watch these videos everywhere.

Learning Goal


In this activity, children will practice counting and adding to tell the number of objects in a group.

Materials

  • 7 feathers
  • 1 Paper plate
  • Yarn
  • Glue
  • Tape
  • Markers
  • Googly eyes
  • 1 Plastic kazoo
  • Colored paper
  • Index cards

Assembly


Step 1: Count your feathers. First, spread out your seven feathers and count them with your child.

Step 2: Make a duck face. Use the paper plate as the center of your duck necklace. Decorate the necklace by attaching one feather and writing the number one below it on the plate. Add another feather and label it two. Continue adding each feather with the next number until you reach seven.

Bonus: Have your child write the number below each feather.

Step 3: Make a beak. Use your marker to draw a triangle beak on the paper plate. Then, finish creating the duck’s face by gluing the googly eyes.

Bonus: Cut a triangle out of construction paper and glue it to the center of the paper plate to make a special beak.

Step 4: Make a necklace. Cut a long piece of yarn and knot both ends together to make a necklace. Create a hole on top of the plate and thread the yarn necklace through the hole. Pull one side through the middle of the other side to secure the duck face to the yarn.

Step 5: Have your child wear the duck necklace and practice counting from one to seven by quacking after saying each number.

Keep the conversation going

  • Form a number sentence with a result of seven or less. For example: For example: 3 + 4 = 7. Ask your child to quack the number three times and then four times. Then, ask what these two numbers add up to together, using the feathers on the plate to count three plus four up to the total of seven.
  • Ask your child to create a number sentence including numbers and symbols. When they form a correct number sentence, they can quack and flap their wings.
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