March 30 | Programming and Activities | Grades 4-8

Today, discover a monster bigger than T. Rex and take virtual trips to other worlds. Then, at home, virtually walk through Smithsonian's exhibitions and dive into the work of artists and authors exploring other worlds.

At-Home Learning: PBS SoCal and KCET, in partnership with LAUSD and in collaboration with California PBS stations, are offering broadcast programming with digital resources that adhere to California’s state curriculum. Download this week’s schedule.

Programming Highlights

NOVA | Bigger than T. Rex
Monday at 8:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m. PST on KLCS and 2:00 p.m. PST on KCET
The T. Rex is perhaps the best known dinosaur, but almost a century ago, there were tantalizing clues of a monster even bigger — the Spinosaurus. Clues to its existence were destroyed during World War II, but a new set of bones found in Morocco could lead to exciting re-discoveries.

Genius by Stephen Hawking | What Are We?
Monday at 11:00 a.m. PST on KLCS
Three ordinary people take on challenges to try to understand what they really are. In this episode, the volunteers are led to an amazing realization about the nature of life itself.

The Great American Read | Other Worlds
Monday at 9 a.m. on KCET and 1:00 p.m. PST on KLCS
Many novels on America’s list of 100 favorites take us to other worlds. From fantasy to science fiction, historical fiction to stories of spiritual realms, what do these books tell us about our own world? How do these novels help us think about real-life and present-day issues.

Books featured in “The Great American Read” episode “Other Worlds”

 

At-Home Learning Tips

Reflect About Family Memories
Take a walk down memory lane. Many children may miss their extended family members during this time of social distancing. Spend some time looking at family photos and take the opportunity to relive special moments like birthdays or family vacations. Read more tips on how to reflect on today’s situation here.

 

Daily Programming

8:00 a.m. Nova: The Day the Dinosaur Died

What Killed the Dinosaurs – Interactive
Mammals Get Their Chance – Discussion Questions
Asteroids: Crash Course Astronomy – Video


9:00 a.m. History Detectives: Andrew Jackson’s Mouth, Barton Letter, Spybook

Civil War Letters – Lesson Plan
Clara Barton – Document
Multiple Perspectives of the War of 1812 – Activity
Crackdown on Civil Liberties in WW1 – Teaching Tips


10:00 a.m. Navajo Math Circles

US Government’s Education of Native American Children
Up Heartbreak Hill: Factors in a Successful College Experience


11:00 a.m. Genius By Stephen Hawking: Where Are We?

Solar Eclipses Explained – Video
Eclipses: Crash Course Astronomy – Video
Distances: Crash Course Astronomy – Video
The Milky Way: Crash Course Astronomy – Video


12:00 p.m. Nova: The Day the Dinosaur Died

What Killed the Dinosaurs – Interactive
Mammals Get Their Chance – Discussion Questions
Asteroids: Crash Course Astronomy – Video


1:00 p.m. The Great American Read: Grand Finale

Symbolism in Ghost – Interactive
Primary Sources – To Kill a Mockingbird – Webpage Images
The Legacy of To Kill a Mockingbird – Procedure

 

Additional Resources

Tour Smithsonian, National Museum of Natural History
Museums are closed, yes, but the discoveries can keep coming. The Smithsonian, National Museum of Natural History virtual tours allow you to take self-guided, room-by-room tours of select exhibits and areas within the museum from their desktop or mobile device. Get a chance to see some past exhibits as well.

Lowriders, Aliens and Cultural Hybridity
Artist Rubén Ortiz-Torres creates fantastic alternate worlds informed by his upbringing in both Mexico and U.S.

Rubén Ortiz-Torres. Alien Toy (La Ranfla Cósmica), 1997 | Collection of Tom Patchett, courtesy of Track 16, Los Angeles
Rubén Ortiz-Torres. Alien Toy (La Ranfla Cósmica), 1997 | Collection of Tom Patchett, courtesy of Track 16, Los Angeles

Octavia E. Butler’s Legacy
Science fiction novelist, MacArthur “genius” grant winner, and Los Angeles-native Octavia E. Butler is an enduring force in literature and beyond. Even in her absence, her work not simply growing in esteem but taking on new coloring and resonance with each passing year. Discover her legacies in the different communities she participated in —African American, science fictional, Afrofuturist, feminist, womanist.